billions of people, all on purpose

Day 2: You Are Not an Accident

A Point to Ponder: “I am not an accident.”
~ This brings, well, relief? Happiness? Maybe even a thought of, “well I sure hope I wasn’t an accident!” So what is Warren’s purpose? I think it was an awesome reflection, actually. His main point is God’s intentionality in knowing us and creating us perfectly for Him, out of His love. He bluntly shares that because God is love, there is already perfect love in the Trinity. Therefore, “God didn’t need to create you. He wasn’t lonely. But he wanted to make you in order to express his love.” It’s interesting to think about creation in such a way. I am me because He loves me. I am exactly the way that I am for the sole purpose of bringing God satisfaction in order to bless the world. That immediately makes me hope that I am doing a sufficient job! But what great motivation lies in working to glorify the Lord through how we innately are. But, as Warren reminds us, because our lives do have real meaning, “we discover that meaning and purpose only when we make God the reference point of our lives.”

Verse to Remember: “I am your Creator. You were in my care even before you were born.” – Isaiah 44:2
~ I don’t often think about the specific details that make me “me” – and I definitely don’t take enough time to reflect on their origin. God chose the way that I am; this includes all of the intricate details of my personality; my qualities as well as my flaws. It may sound really odd to say, but I had never thought about how displeasing it must be for God to see people change the way they are because they don’t feel adequate. “God prescribed every single detail of your body. He deliberately chose your race, the color of your hair, and every other feature. He custom-made your body just the way he wanted it.” It is interesting to look at our materialistic and image-based society through this unique lens, and to examine it this way. I really liked this poem that Warren included to put this point into perspective (credit to Russell Kelfer):

You are who you are for a reason
You’re part of an intricate plan.
You’re a precious and unique design,
Called God’s special woman or man.

You look like you look for a reason.
Our God made no mistake.
He knit you together within the womb,
You’re just what he wanted to make.

The parents you had were the ones he chose,
And no matter how you may feel,
They were custom-designed with God’s plan in mind,
And they bear the Master’s seal.

No, that trauma you faced was not easy,
And God wept that it hurt you so;
But it was allowed to shape your heart
So that into His likeness you’d grow.

You are who you are for a reason,
You’ve been formed by the Master’s rod.
You are who you are, beloved,
Because there is a God!

I loved this. Not only does it roll off the tongue (a skill that I really just never acquired), but it takes into account an issue that many people have in accepting the existence of God: and that is the presence of bad things happening in the world. I think this poem beautifully states it: God weeps at our sorrows and how it hurts us, but knowing that our heart will be shaped into a stronger being makes it worth the price.

Question to Consider: I know that God uniquely created me. What areas of my personality, background, and physical appearance am I struggling to accept?
~ Well this is a heavy one. No room for beating around the bush with this question. First off, I think that everyone struggles with all of these things – personality, background, and most definitely physical appearance. For me, my personality confuses me because I often overwhelm myself. I’m overly social at times, but that is when I’m not comfortable with a new group. Odd as it sounds, as I become more at ease, I quiet down and form deeper relationships. So that makes me uneasy at times, and remains to be something I struggle with. Since this apparently is honesty hour, I’ll come out right now and say that I don’t struggle with my background – at least when it comes to where I’m from or my family. There are things in my past I struggle with, obviously, as everyone does. But for the most part, this is an area of my life that I feel is abundantly blessed by our God. When it comes to physical appearance, I suffer from lack of confidence just like most do. As a total gym rat, I’m always figuring out how my fitness level can increase and how I can look better than I do now. I’m mildly ashamed to admit that I’m rarely fully satisfied with how I appear, and I pick away at things that I need to work on. But somehow, admitting it behind this screen to all of you seems therapeutic – so there’s that. I think, however, that the constant reminder of God’s specific creation of all that I am makes me more at ease with the things I criticize myself for. I hope that this awareness helps you, my lovely readers, with some solace as well.

How’s that for Day 2? Let me know what you think of this, if you’ve made it this far!

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About Christina Moore

Originally from Portland, Maine, I now live in Chicago and work with extraordinary nonprofit organizations to help them champion their individual causes. My heart is in the 207, and my feet are on the ground in the 312. Enjoy readmoore!
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One Response to billions of people, all on purpose

  1. Maggie says:

    Beautiful. Love the poem. And I love the part about how God picked our families, races, etc especially for us. Wow, I’m very blessed. Hard to accept that he loves the things about myself I want to change (hips, tummy, attitude, etc) but therapeutic as well.

    Xoxoxoxo

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